Education, Education, Education

I hated school when I was a kid. From the second I stepped into Mrs Thrussell’s classroom at age 5 to the last afternoon when I walked out of secondary school having finished my final exam. I was free. I spent over a decade in various classrooms daydreaming about ways in which I could escape the monotony of school life. These ranged from a jet engine under my seat to blast through the school roof to bringing in a very big coat on a windy day, catching a gust and it carrying me home to my Transformers collection. The problem was I was never engaged. I never wanted to learn, at least not in a classroom, and I was pretty much allowed to coast through school without any real great academic success. My school reports ALL read the same.

 

Very bright, has great potential. He just needs to concentrate and stop daydreaming/chatting. 

ATA_Education

I can count on one hand the times I was truly excited about school:
In my second year of secondary school we learnt about The Great war and I couldn’t get enough of it and If I remember correctly I aced my exam, but decided to study Geography instead…TWAT.

In my fourth year as part of our science module we had to learn about astrophysics. This was more exciting and fascinating then anything I had ever learned. I was truly in awe  by it and what’s more I had a superb teacher, Mr Newbury. In fact all his science lessons were exceptional. This is a passion I still carry with me today.

That’s it. They were the only times I was actually excited about learning and I find it terribly upsetting. Firstly because I squandered an 11 year, free education when there are people in the world who receive none. But also because every single one of my teachers saw that I had great potential and I was left to slide away. Of course I’m not trying to blame anyone else but me, to this day I need a kick up the arse to get going. What’s also sad is I’m not the only one.

Everyday thousands of children begrudgingly trundle into school to endure six hours of boredom. And I don’t blame them. I don’t blame the children for feeling disengaged and I certainly don’t blame the teachers. What I do think is at fault is the system that both teacher and student have to endure.

The public education system was developed towards the end of the 19th century to meet the demands of the industrial revolution and it hasn’t really moved on since. Of course there has been an influx of lessons ranging from Japanese to Economics but the school system is still based on the same model from that of the late 19th century. A model that is based on group learning, the memorisation of dates, numbers and facts, standardised tests, the stopping and starting of lessons with bells and whistles, structured breaks, uniforms and desks lined in rows.

All children learn differently, adults too. Some work better in a group, some on their own. Some work better in the morning whilst others flourish in the afternoon.  Some are visual learners whilst others only need to listen to instructions to understand. So our schools need to be structured in a way that accommodates all the different ways we learn. A school that is open from 8.00am to 8.00pm where students have as much autonomy as the teachers. A school that doesn’t have children sitting in rows and being herded from class to class every hour like cattle. A school where a child can take a break whenever he or she feels the need to. A school where the emphasis on Music, Drama And Art is just as strong as it is on English, Maths and Science. A school where a student’s pathway can be devoid of the three Rs and will suit their needs. A true school of the future.

I think if we’re going to reform our school system, and we need to, then we need to take lessons from countries like Finland. Finland outstrips the UK in Reading, Maths and Science year after year. There are no tuition fees and compulsory education starts at age 7, so as not to interrupt childhood; and finishes at age 15. Early education focuses on life, respect towards others, and social attitudes. Classes are usually small, no more than twenty, and there are no standardised tests. The end of year exam usually consists of a verbal assessment. Children will learn two foreign languages and 4-11 periods a week are dedicated to arts and craft. Homework is kept to a minimum to enable students to participate in extracurricular activities. There are state subsidised music schools and for a minimal fee students can learn a musical instrument along with music theory. Reading for pleasure is also highly encouraged. Finland currently produces more children’s books than any other country and there are free school meals for anyone in full time education.

Teachers are selected from the top 10% of academics and all teachers must have a masters. Their salary reflects the importance of schooling children which is why competition for teaching jobs is fierce. They are given far more autonomy than their British counterparts and they are simply instructed to “Do what ever it takes”
There is no drop out rate and if a student does fall behind they receive one to one tuition and a brought back up to speed and it’s almost unheard of that they hold a student back a year.

It’s practically the mirror opposite of what we do the UK. Our current education secretary Michael Gove is in favour of putting more emphasis on tests rather than coursework, longer school days and getting back to the three Rs (Reading, writing and Arithmetic) There is no doubt that Maths, English and Science are important. But are they any more important than Music? or History? Certainly not. Especially if one wants to be a musician or an historian.

Children who are starting school this year will be retiring in 2083 and we need to ensure that they are as well rounded and as well educated as they can possibly be because we have no idea what the world will look like in 2020 let alone 2083.

I’m happy that I live in a country that has a public school system, it just needs updating. It needs to reflect 21st century life and it has to keep children engaged. It has to be an environment that children want to learn in and that teachers want to teach in. This isn’t going to happen if we keep pumping money into an outdated, victorian model. There is too much emphasis on getting a job and this isn’t the business of education; and too much pressure on children from teachers and parents asking “What are you going to do when you leave school”…..My answer? Whatever the fuck I want!!

Children need to be taught HOW to think not WHAT to think.

 

“When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.”- John Lennon 

 

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2 thoughts on “Education, Education, Education

  1. The school system in the U.S. was actually in my opinion much better when I was in school than today. And this was the 60’s. Yeah we sat in rows and had a bell, but we also had drama club,chess club,debate team,student council, spanish club, art, music that included marching band, orchestra, jazz band, symphony band. sports were basketball, baseball, track, cross country, tennis, swimming, diving, wrestling,football,volleyball, and golf. There were 4 plays the drama club put on each year as well. And we had dances after every Friday night basketball and football game with the music being supplied by my band as well as others. They taught how to run lights and design sets for the plays a well. Oh and automobile shop, metal shop, and woodworking shop. Oh for the good old days.
    And as a result of our education we became free thinkers, we questioned authority, we stopped the war in Viet Nam, we demanded equality for African Americans, and we got into the streets by the millions to demonstrate for both those causes. We grew our hair long and wore shabby clothes, and changed the face of music. Then we went to work, and through the seventies and eighties we created the biggest economic boom in the history of this country. Oh for the good old days.

  2. It’s a very difficult job, where disengagement is a real problem. I can highly recommend the book Open by David Price as an excellent blueprint of a more positive way forward, that draws heavily from Scandanavian model schools.

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